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dc.creatorMedina Arellano, María de Jesús
dc.creatorPalacios-González, César
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T00:00:37Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T00:00:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://ru.juridicas.unam.mx:80/xmlui/handle/123456789/14301
dc.description.abstractNews about the first baby born after a mitochondrial replacement technique (MRT; specifically maternal spindle transfer) broke on September 27, 2016 and, in a matter of hours, went global. Of special interest was the fact that the mitochondrial replacement procedure happened in Mexico. One of the scientists behind this world first was quoted as having said that he and his team went to Mexico to carry out the procedure because, in Mexico, there are no rules. In this paper, we explore Mexico's rule of law in relation to mitochondrial replacement techniques and show that, in fact, certain instances of MRTs are prohibited at the federal level and others are prohibited at the state level. According to our interpretation of the law, the scientists behind this first successful MRT procedure broke federal regulations regarding assisted fertilization research.es_MX
dc.formatapplication/httpes_MX
dc.language.isoenes_MX
dc.publisherOxford University Presses_MX
dc.relation.ispartofVol.4,No. 3 (Diciembre 2017)
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://academic.oup.com/journals
dc.sourceJournal of Law and the Biosciences. Vol.4, No. 3 (Diciembre 2017)es_MX
dc.titleMitochondrial replacement techniques and Mexico's rule of law: on the legality of the first maternal spindle transfer casees_MX
dc.typeArticlees_MX
dc.identifier.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/jlb/article/4/1/50/3078927


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